The Benefits of Learning How to Bartend Online

November 9, 2012 in How to Bartend

By Ethan Harris

Learning how to bartend is a dream shared by many people. Bartending is a respectable profession, and can certainly be fun! By learning how to mix high quality drinks, you can guarantee a good time for yourself and those around you.

Many people assume going to bartending school would be the best way to learn how to bartend. When in reality, it’s the most expensive and lengthy way to learn bartending. But with the beauty of the internet, you can learn how to bartend completely online.

If you’re interested in learning how to bartend, then you should consider this as a viable alternative to bartending school. For less than the cost of a few drinks, you can have a complete online course, detailing every aspect of the bartending industry.

There’s no need for printing oversized paper books, because you can have thousands of drink recipes on one site without cutting down one tree! It doesn’t get much better than this. But as with any profession, your going to need to know the basics before anyone will take you seriously. No need to worry yourself though, as bartending can easily be learned from the comfort of your own home with online bartending guides.

Another added benefit is being able to make drinks on request. With a good online database of drink recipes, you can have the confidence it takes to make any drink at any time. You just go to your computer and type in exactly what they requested and presto! You can be making high quality drinks in a matter of minutes.

For a complete, up to date bartending guide, go to http://RapidBartender.com

There’s also a members area with over 9000 drink recipes, and an awesome bartending guide you can get started with right now.

Discover how to bartend like a pro from the comfort of your home.

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The History Of Bartending, Or, It All Started With Og

November 5, 2012 in Uncategorized

The history of bartending is probably just a little younger than the history of alcohol. As soon as humans discovered that the fermented juice of fruits, which seemed to make bees and butterflies behave a bit goofy when they sipped it, was good for humans as well, then the bartending profession began.

A guy name Og was probably the first one. The vine outside his cave seemed to have the most crazy-making fruits in the autumn. He learned how to gather the liquid, and exchanged a gourd full for a couple of wild boar chops or some fish. His neighbors hung around to drink and get silly, and to complain about how their wife made eyes at the fellas from the next door tribe, and how she didn’t even keep the cave clean. Og’s became the regular hang out after the hunt. Some of the guys even liked to do a bit of drumming and chanting after a few gourd’s worth of Og’s brew.

Time passes, and civilization grows. Public drinking houses were associated with places where beer was brewed, or where wine was made. Most large houses in Europe had their own brewery or vineyard, but the common people had to get their grog from somewhere. Rather than carry it away to drink at home, people drank their purchase on the spot. It was more fun that way, and more convenient. The bartender would be the brewer or vintner. Eventually it was noticed that sales increased if instead of the brewer, one of his or her attractive young relatives dispensed the pots of ale, a feature designed to keep the customers happy and drinking.

Many bartenders, who were usually also the bar owners, became wealthy citizens. Eventually the bar became not just a drinking spot, but a place for people to come and socialize, talk about the issues of the day, maybe eat a meal, and escape from family cares. Most homes would have been very modest indeed, and the bar offered luxurious amenities such as lighting at night, a place to sit down, and of course food and drink.

There weren’t many bartenders amongst the Pilgrim Fathers as far as we know, but as soon as America began to be seriously settled by Europeans, the bartenders were amongst the first on the boat. They were alongside the workers, farmers , whores and speculators as the great push west began. If Hollywood is to be believed, and in this case it probably is, the western town had a bar with its bartender before it had a doctor, a school or a church.

The real mystique of modern bartending can be traced back to the roaring twenties, the cocktail era, and to Prohibition, when the only place to drink was the speakeasy. The bartender wielded power, had access to forbidden fruits, and the job of bartending had an aura of danger and excitement which perhaps has never quite been left behind. The lure of the forbidden ensured that bars and bartenders would have a permanent place in western cultural life from then on.

In modern times, the role of the bartender has become even more sophisticated and crucial to the running of a top class successful enterprise, such as a hotel or restaurant. With its multifaceted demands, the job of bartender has taken its place in the ranks of professions, and bartending has become a respected occupation which at the highest levels can command an impressive salary.   A long way from Og and his fermented fruit juice, but human nature probably hasn’t changed much in the course of all those thousands of years – people still like a strong drink in comfortable surroundings, a bit of music, and a friendly ear into which they can pour their troubles.

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A Career As A Wine Sommelier – Is It For You?

November 2, 2012 in wine

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A Sommelier is a senior employee in a restaurant, almost invariably an upscale restaurant or the restaurant of a five star hotel. His responsibility is for the wines which the restaurant serves; he sometimes has additional responsibility for general bar service and fine cigars, although in most instances these latter will be the responsibility of the bartender.

The Sommelier’s job is to purchase, store and serve the wine offered by a restaurant, also the wine used in the kitchen for cooking. He will work very closely with the chef to ensure that the wines offered will complement the menus and style of cooking the restaurant offers. His choice of wine may even at times influence the dishes which the chef designs, for example, if the Sommelier finds a delectable desert wine which would go perfectly with a wild plum sorbet served with an apple crisp, the chef might be inclined to add a dish along those lines to his desert menu.

It is important that the Sommelier understands the buying power of the restaurant’s customers. If he stocks only a range of modestly priced wines, he may be losing the chance for major profits. On the other hand, if the wines are overpriced, this will deter customers from ordering and from coming back. Many restaurants are patronized as much for their excellent wines as for their food.

The Sommelier is in charge of training junior staff, and that includes all the wait staff, including the wine waiters. The Sommelier himself will probably only serve the most expensive wines or the most distinguished guests, although he will be at hand to adjudicate if a guest is not happy with a wine. Although the customer is always right, it is common these days for the Sommelier to taste an important wine before it is served, to ensure that it is exactly as it should be – not “corked”, and at the perfect temperature. The Sommelier may suggest to the wine waiter that the wine be decanted, or allowed to breath a little longer to allow the flavor to present itself at its best.

The Sommelier will never ever argue with a customer regarding wine, this would be in the worst possible interests of the restaurant. As taste is a personal matter, if a customer rejects a wine, then this must be smilingly accepted by the Sommelier, and a substitute offered. There is always a use for a rejected bottle, unless of course it really is corked or otherwise sub standard. Wine can be sold by the glass, used for training junior staff, used in cooking or simply, with permission, drunk by the senior staff at the end of a long shift.

Not just anyone can become a Sommelier. You have to have training, obviously in wine purchasing, storage and serving, but also in general restaurant management, and in a smattering of foreign languages, specifically French, Italian, Spanish and German, to allow for correct pronunciation of names. You must have a marvelous palette, and be a connoisseur, not a drunk. It will be important for you to be in continuous training, but a top Sommelier will have no shortage of offers from wine producers and distributors to come and learn more about the wines they offer.

Sommelier jobs are relatively few and far between compared to bartending jobs, but if you are a wine enthusiast, this is an excellent career to aim for.

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Bartending – a Secure Career With Plenty of Job Opportunities

October 26, 2012 in Bartending job

Jobs which were once thought very secure are nowadays a thing of the past. Who would have thought that skilled jobs in car manufacturing, ship building and the like would one day disappear like smoke? Yet there’s one profession that you can almost guarantee will be with us for ever – a profession which has been with us for thousands of years. No, not the first one which springs to mind, but that valuable underpinning of society, bartending. There will never be a shortage of bartending jobs.

It is possible to imagine going into a bar, keying in your credit card number, and having your cocktail or beer dispensed to you by a machine. The machine might even greet you by name, tell you to enjoy your beverage, and dispense a carefully measured portion of snack items – one beer equals fifteen peanuts. The drink dispensing machine may even ask you to blow into a breathalyzer to ensure that you’re sober enough to have an alcoholic drink. In fact, it’s almost certain that in some godforsaken bar in the techno suburbs of Tokyo, this actually happens. Yes, it’s possible to imagine this horrible soulless experience – but is it possible to imagine enjoying it?

The human bartender can never be replaced; he or she fulfills so many useful roles. He is lord of the bar, keeping everything humming like a top. The bartender welcomes the customer into his world, dispenses drinks which are designed to exactly hit the spot, keeps everything clean and sparkling, makes sure no one gets too drunk, listens to everyone’s woes and triumphs, watches out that the laws are being obeyed, ensures that the cash register keeps ringing healthily and profitably, and all the time dreams up the great new creations which have the customers come back for more.

The bartender sets the tone for everything that happens in the bar. Is the atmosphere good, is the music right for the time of night and the make up of the crowd, not too loud, not too soft? Are the assistant bar staff attentive, are the ashtrays being emptied, the tables being cleaned, is that lady over there in need of rescue from an over persistent would be suitor? The bartender is balancing a host of elements in his mind all the time, elements which go to make up a great night out for his customers.

A mixture of culinary artist, accountant, housekeeper, policeman, psychiatrist, interior designer, sergeant major and mother all rolled into one, the bartender has an almost unique role to play in the service industry world. He or she is vital to the successful operation not only of the bar, but of the wider business which the bar may be a part of. How many people stay at a certain hotel, or eat at a particular restaurant, because the bartender makes the overall experience such a good one for them? Not for nothing are the best bartenders fiercely wooed by prospecting employers, they are as valuable as great chefs, and as such, the bartender at the pinnacle of his career can almost name his own price.

Yes, the bartender is going to be around for as long as there are thirsty people looking for a great drink, in a congenial atmosphere, served by a creative mixologist with a sympathetic listening ear. A good bartender need never fear that he or she will be replaced by a machine, if anything as leisure time increases the demand for bartenders will become even higher.

If you are trying to get started in barteding check out our bartenders guide.

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The Best US Cities for Bartending.

October 17, 2012 in Bartending School

So, you’ve been to bartending school, you have your trusty bartender’s guide at your fingertips, and you’ve gained some good experience in a nice local bar. Now you feel it’s time to spread your wings, and check out the action in the cities with some of the best bars in the world. Where should you head to find the best paying, coolest bartending jobs in the USA?

Here are some of the hotspots, in no special order:

New York City has a bewildering range of bars, clubs and nightspots, everything from conventional sports bars where you’ll spend most of your time pouring beer and filling bowls of pretzels, to ultra sophisticated Manhattan hideaways frequented by wealthy matrons, to roaring nightclubs full of fashionistas and music which offer serious damage to your ears. The sheer variety of styles is a major attraction, you can head to New York and dip into the eclectic culture, shopping around until you find the place that fits your personality.

New Orleans barely skipped a beat for Katrina, the party goes on and on, especially in and around the French Quarter. The food is Creole, the music is jazz and the alcohol flows like water, particularly during Mardi Gras. Plenty of tourist spots, which aren’t always the best bet for the seriously ambitious bartender. After all, how many Hurricanes does a person want to mix? But if you love jazz and wonderful food, New Orleans has an air of decadence and mystery all of its own, an attractive place to develop your trade if you stay away from Bourbon Street.

Hollywood is probably the place to avoid if you are serious about your bartending career, unless of course you have the looks of Jude Law and the survival instincts of a roach. Only the very beautiful are allowed to do so much as serve a glass of water here, and all bartenders are resting actors, it seems to be some kind of by-law. Probably not for the serious mixologist, although once you make your reputation as one of the USA’s top bartenders, it might be a place to be tempted to by invitation only, to serve your creations to the terminally lovely.

Las Vegas is Disneyland for grown ups, and has plenty of work for the talented and the plain ordinary bartender. This 24/7 fantasy world prefers its visitors a little under the influence of the grape and grain – not to mention the Pina Colada and the Margerita. On the whole though, think quantity rather than quality; there are very few truly classy night spots, although there are plenty of off-the-beaten track hard-drinking bars catering to the truly vast army of workers who keep the visitors fed, watered and entertained in this neon oasis in the desert.

Wherever you go to seek to develop your bartending career, you should seek out a small up and coming place rather than try to head straight for the top – unless you already have some outstanding experience and excellent references in your pocket. One tip is to try to find work in a place where bartenders, bar staff, chefs and kitchen staff themselves go to drink. This might mean pulling lots of very late shifts, but it’s a great way to develop those all important contacts.

Studying For The Bar- Bartending School

October 9, 2012 in Bartending School

Bartending is a fun, lucrative yet demanding profession, and there are generally speaking two routes to the top. You can start bussing tables, and gradually crawl up the greasy pole until maybe, just maybe, you finally make it to being a bartender, or you can get yourself a qualification in bartending at bartending school, and walk right into some of the hottest jobs around.

There are bartending courses all around the country, and if there isn’t a good one near you, then look for one on line. Bartending school courses tend to be very flexible, to take account of the fact that people on them are often holding down a job whilst they study. Classes can be during day, during the evening, even at weekends. The best schools offer a mixture of serious study as well as a lot of fun, nightclub atmosphere classes – most people really enjoy their time at bartending school.

You will be expected to work hard and to take your course seriously; after all this is not just an enjoyable and rewarding profession, but one which carries a lot of responsibility for both the financial success of your bar and the well being and safety of both fellow employees and customers. So the whole range of subjects will be taught; legal, health and safety, professional skills, customer service, dealing with money, stock control, how to choose and look after the tools of your trade, how to dress, how to deal with difficult situations, and of course, the all important mixology.

Naturally, as with all education, there is a cost for bartending school, and it may be that as a struggling beginner, you’ll find it hard to justify that cost to yourself. However, top bartenders can earn both a decent salary and a lot of terrific tips. Not only that, bartending is one of the few growth employment areas in the world today – your chances of finding a much better job as a result of your qualification are excellent. So it really is an investment which will pay off. Most schools offer helpful easy terms, will take credit cards and in general, make the financial aspect very easy to deal with.

Just about all bartending schools have a fantastic network of contacts which will help you find a job, and most can do job placement all over the country. You’ll be joining an elite group of trained bartenders, and alumni of bartending school tend to look out for each other and are a great source of employment as well as new bartending ideas and trends.

Speaking of ideas and trends, it’s in the bartending schools that some of the hottest new directions in mixology begin. When enthusiasts gather together, magic happens. If you are keen to be the best possible bartender that you can be, you owe it to yourself to get that qualification to put up behind the bar, and to be in on the ground floor of everything that’s trending in bartending.

So even if school was never your thing, consider how great it will be to know that you have a professional qualification in one of the hottest and most exciting careers around today.

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The Bartenders Guide- Your Infallible Bible

October 5, 2012 in bartenders guide

So you’ve done a bit of casual work behind a bar or two, and the bug has bitten you. Bartending is the career for you. You sit up nights experimenting with weird and wonderful cocktail creations -(most but not all of which your friends love – you get yourself a snappy bartending outfit and a battery of equipment, you even have a sneaky practice with juggling bottles. You’re ready to go, right? Well, no, wrong actually. You need to acquire a bit more bartending knowledge than how to make the perfect twist of lemon peel and put out fresh peanuts.  A bartenders guide will help you immensely.

If you can’t get yourself enrolled on a bartending course (and you should make every effort to do so) then you must at least arm yourself with a bartending guide. These can be find in print versions or online.

A good bartenders guide will advise and teach you in some absolutely critical areas. These include:

 

  • The qualities you need to become a great bartender
  • What your duties are as a bartender
  •  Basic and advanced bartending skills and techniques
  •  How to make mixed drinks
  •  Cocktail garnishes, when and how to use them
  •  Specific gravity charts (to help you make those fabulous layered creations)
  •  A bartenders’ responsibilities under the law – this is a big and important area that you must get well under your belt before heading out into employment as a bartender. It includes health and safety as well as things like the laws on drinking age.
  •  The duties of a barback (the bartender’s assistant)
  •  Bartending equipment and tools
  •  Measures and glasses

Being a bartender is not just a fun job, although of course, it is a fun job, it’s a lot of fun, and that’s why you want to do it. It’s also a job which many people set off in, thinking it’s just a romp in the park, only to end up in miserable failure.

Check out the number one Bartenders guide!

As a bartender you have a lot of responsibilities. You have to first and foremost ensure that you and the establishment you are working in are obeying the law. That means knowing how and when to card, how to deal with people who’ve had too much to drink, how to deal with people who seem as if they are about to drive intoxicated and a whole raft of health and safety issues.

 

You need to make sure that you’re charging the right amount, dispensing the right amount of alcohol, and giving the right change, keeping everything clean, being prepared for rushes and lulls, in other words, your bar is being run in a businesslike way. You have to make sure your customers are happy, comfortable and secure in their environment, and of course, that they are enjoying their beverages and ordering more.

 

And the height and pinnacle of your calling; you have to be a master mixologist, making wonderful, delicious, exciting and attractive drinks night after night.

 

Sounds like a tall order? Well, yes it is, and that is why every bartender worthy of the name keeps a bartenders’ guide close at hand and refers to it frequently. It’s a bit like being a doctor. A doctor doesn’t just get his training and leave it at that. You’ll find that if you go to visit your doctor, he’ll often check on line and consult in books when he is deciding on a treatment. Does that make him a bad doctor? No, quite the reverse, it makes him a good doctor, because he is constantly checking and updating his knowledge. A professional bartender should use a regularly updated bartenders’ guide in just the same way.

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Cocktail Mixing Basics

September 22, 2012 in cocktail mixing

Everybody enjoys sipping a cocktail, and there are literally thousands to choose from. Most bartenders have their own secret recipe that has the customers coming back for more. So how do you start as a beginner cocktail maker?

First, gather your equipment together. You need a good cocktail shaker, large but not too large to handle comfortably, stainless steel is generally the preferred material. You need a jigger, with which to measure ingredients, a muddler, for crushing sugar, a juicer, for extracting juice from citrus fruits, a long handled mixing spoon and last of all a fine mesh strainer. Of course, you will also need a sharp knife for cutting the fruit which so often features in tropical inspired cocktail offerings. As you get more experienced you will want to add to this collection, for example more than one size of strainer, a grater for nutmeg and chocolate toppings and so on.

The ideal cocktail is a balance between strong and weak alcohol, for example gin and martini, and sweet and sour flavors, for example sugar and lemon. Getting the right proportions is absolutely essential, as is consistency from drink to drink.

Start with a simple yet challenging cocktail, the Martini made with gin. Everyone has their own idea of the perfect Martini, personally I love a Dirty Martini (made with a little olive juice). Find a friend who likes Martinis, and practice making the most authentic offering. You will have no shortage of volunteers to be testers! Get a few classics like the Martini, the Highball, the Daiquiri, the Mojito, the Bloody Mary, the Margarita, the Pina Colada, and whatever you notice is a favorite in the better bars around your area, under your belt to give you confidence.

Once you have mastered these, check out some of the fancier cocktails, there are many recipe books and online recipes. It makes sense to use local ingredients where you can, for example, in the tropics, major on coconut, pineapple and mango, in colder climes, focus on warming brandy and chocolate concoctions and spicy mulled wines.

In general when you are building your own recipe, start out with the sweet element, then add the sour, then the weaker alcohol, for example curacao, and finally the strong alcohol. That way you can ensure you are getting the right balance. Don’t forget the function of ice; crushed ice and whole cubes behave very differently, and the amount of ice you use will have a big influence on the way the drink tastes, especially as the customer gets down to the bottom of the glass. Too much ice can make the end of the drink insipid, you want to leave him looking forward to the next one, not feeling as if the drink was pretty weak and not worth the money.

Whatever you do, don’t neglect presentation, try to match the glass and the decorations with the drink. A Martini definitely doesn’t need a parasol and a couple of cherries, it should however be served in a good Martini glass. Pay attention to the temperature of the glass, nothing is worse than a chilled cocktail served in a warm glass fresh from the wash! A rim of salt or sugar, a twist of lime, properly crushed ice, all these are the finishing touches. Spend time working to make sure that you have mastered the art of presentation. Tropical cocktails look especially lovely if presented with a flower, but make sure the flower are washed, you don’t want an ant running out onto your beautiful creation.

Mint and other herbs are currently very popular as finishing touches on many cocktails. Ask around local gardening friends to see if you can source small supplies of unusual things like lemon thyme and dill, which can be sensational taste enhancers and will really make your name as an expert.  Remember these cocktail mixing techniques and you will be on your way to becoming a cocktail master.

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Bartending Terms, What do you need to Know?

September 16, 2012 in bartending terms

Bartending terms are the common language and jargon used by bartenders, bar owners, and customers. Novice bartenders and experienced bartenders must understand how to speak the language of the bartending industry. Learning and adopting bartending terms into our vocabulary allows bar workers to communicate with one another and relate to their customers. Customer satisfaction is necessary to encourage patronage. Every industry has its own language and jargon that may sound foreign unless you learn to speak the language.

There are numerous types of bartending terms that describe various components of the bar. Common bartending terms describe the type of drink a customer orders, how they want it served, and directions to the bartender. Novice bartenders often consult a bartending terms dictionary or reference guide while they are studying mixology. From a business perspective, bar owners may not want a bartender to open this book every time they serve a customer. For this reason, it is essential for bartenders to learn bartending terms and communicate in the bartending language.

One of the most common bartending terms is “on the rocks”. Customers order a beverage on the rocks when they want the drink mixed “up” and poured over ice. How the beverage is served to the customer includes another set of bartending terms. Drinks may be served in a highball glass, shot glass, wine glass, among others. The glass may be frosted to keep drinks very cold. Frosting a glass includes dipping a glass in water and then freezing it. The way that we make a drink is another set of bartending terms. If a customer orders a chaser, the customer receives perhaps a soda with a shot or a shot and a beer. Blended drinks are usually frozen drinks that have been prepared in a blender of some other sort of electric mixer. These drinks tend to be fruit flavored drinks mixed with chopped ice. Other common bartending terms refer to what a bartender adds to a drink. A dash is a drop of an ingredient that is added to a drink. Perhaps the bartender has added a dash of lemon or liquor to a drink. Some drinks are prepared in layers. The bartending term layered means that the drink is prepared by sequentially placing the heaviest liquor on the bottom followed in order with the lightest liquor on top. If a drink is poured in the glass without mixing it, bartenders call this a mist. A neat drink is poured into a glass without any ice cubes or additional mixers. If the bartender adds a non-alcoholic into an alcoholic beverage, this is known as a mixer. Several popular mixed drinks such as margaritas are presented to the customer with salt around the edge. Drinks that are to be “salted” provide the direction to salt the rim of the glass. These bartending terms become common vocabulary over time and with practice and consistency.

Aside from the types of drinks made and directions to follow while preparing drinks, there are additional bartending terms for consideration. Serving a drink with a twist tells the bartender to take a lemon and rub it around the edge of the glass. Usually the lemon is then dropped into the glass and served to the customer in this manner. The bartending terms garnish or ornamental garnish help make the drink appear visually pleasant. Garnishing may be adding a piece of cherry or fruit slice to the glass. Aesthetics are pleasing to customers and encourage them to perhaps order another because the drink created an impression. First impressions are lasting impressions that encourage customer patronage. So make sure you know all the bartending term necessary to become a bartender.

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Attitudes of a Pro Bartender

September 13, 2012 in How to Bartend

As a bartender, you are often the most important face of the establishment for which you work, the person who comes into the most personal contact with the customer. So if one word sums up what your attitude should be, it’s “professional”.

No matter how bad you may be feeling, no matter if you had a fight with your partner before you left home, or your feet hurt, or your child is giving trouble at school, you have to put all that behind you, put a genuine smile of welcome on your face, and look forward to making everybody who comes up to your bar feel happy and special.

Wear clean, appropriate, smart clothes; it’s particularly important to wear comfortable shoes as you are going to be on your feet for hours at a time. Make sure that you present a clean well groomed appearance, especially your hands, which will be the focus of attention as you mix and serve drinks and snacks. Hair should be neat and tidy, not flopping around, people with long hair may want to tie it back in a pony tail or barrette, this makes it easier to work and is more hygienic. Your employer will probably have a dress code which you should stick to.

It’s very important that the bar is kept clean and well organized with supplies of cocktail makings fresh and ready to hand. Whenever there is a quiet moment, you should be cleaning, tidying preparing and polishing. This will carry you through those hectic times when the orders are coming at you one after the other like bullets flying in a shoot out! A gleaming, well presented bar encourages the customers to buy, and that is your job of course.

Of course, you need to offer a sympathetic ear to those people who think the bartender is their personal psychiatrist, but never get too involved in a conversation. Non committal sympathy is really all that’s required; it’s not a good idea to give your opinions on what a fool they have been!

It’s important to give correct measures, and to pay attention to what the customer asks for. If he asks for a splash of soda, then a splash, not a deluge, is what he should get. And of course, it’s vitally important to pay attention to giving correct change, if you are handling cash, and to keeping the account straight, if you are making up a tab. You should also work on cultivating your memory, so that when someone comes in and asks for”My usual” you know what that is!

You need to pay attention to the law. You should have a very responsible attitude to underage drinking, and don’t be afraid to ask for and examine i.d. if you think someone is underage. Making a mistake or being neglectful in this area might get both you and your employer into serious trouble. And you should understand and apply both the law and your employer’s policy on serving people who are clearly seriously drunk.

It’s also your job to make sure that customers are not harassed, especially women on their own who aren’t looking for company. The bar tender should be that lady’s protector.

If you see someone hesitating over the cocktail menu, don’t be afraid to make a suggestion. Keep up to date with the latest trends in mixology (the art of mixing cocktails), but memorize the recipes of the old tried and true favorites like the Screwdriver, the Rusty Nail, and the Manhattan, the Pina Colada, the Bloody Mary and more, which customers will ask for again and again.

If you suggest something interesting and delicious, especially to younger women, who may not be experienced drinkers, the customer will feel that you are paying special attention to them, and hopefully a good tip will result. On the important subject of tips, they will of course form a large part of your income. Customers who haven’t yet tipped you will notice your reaction to what other guests are tipping, so always look pleased and grateful even if someone leaves you a stingy, mean little amount. Never angle for tips, this just embarrasses everyone and makes you look bad. If you do a great job, the tips will flow.

Altogether, the attitude of a bar tender should be service and customer oriented, highly professional, kind, responsible and hard working. Bartending may be just a temporary job between other jobs or when working your way through college, or it may be a serious long term career. Either way, your attitude to the job can make it a very enjoyable and rewarding experience.

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